University of Toronto National Report 2002 Innovation 175 Years
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elcome to Innovation X 175 = U of T, the University of Toronto National Report 2002. Distributed nationally with The Globe and Mail on November 22, 2002, the National Report showcases the innovations in scholarship and teaching that have made U of T the number one research university in Canada. A survey of the year in review, the report also includes key performance indicators and financial details for the university.

As the nation's top research university, U of T aims to push the frontiers of knowledge on all fronts. Many of the nation's top experts on global competitiveness - the ability of Canadian companies to compete internationally - can be found at the university. Scholars at U of T also generate groundbreaking ideas on such social issues as terrorism, mass media and child abuse. Advances in health are revolutionizing our understanding of medical puzzles such as the make-up of human cells and Alzheimer's disease. Science and technology research is an area of strength at the university, generating discoveries in the fields of nanotechnology and tissue engineering. Scholars of arts and culture are using interdisciplinary approaches to challenge traditional views of literature, art and social history.

By bringing together great minds from a range of backgrounds and convictions,
U of T encourages dialogue that breaks down stale thinking and creates fresh perspectives. We have invited top scholars and opinion makers at the university to sound off on various hot button topics on our discussion board. You can add your own voice to the debate by posting a comment or voting in the online poll.

Innovation has long been a hallmark at U of T. In its 175-year history, the university has been home to some of the world's most original thinkers, including six Nobel Prize-winning graduates, two female astronauts, two graduates who went on to become prime minister, the first black Canadian doctor, the first Canadian aboriginal medical graduate and the world's first female aircraft designer. You can read more about these trailblazers in the historical timeline.

Like what you're seeing? Have a complaint? Any questions or comments on the editorial content of the National Report can be sent to coleen.scott@utoronto.ca.


All contents copyright © 2002, University of Toronto. All rights reserved.

Rocco Kusi-Achampong
Students' Administrative Council President and Arts student
Signa Daum Shanks
Graduate Student at the Faculty of Law
Christine Henry
Alumna (St. Michael's 1996)
Cora Larkins
Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering staff
Mary Anne Chambers
Alumna (UTSC 1998)
Zheng-Hong Lu
Metallurgy and Materials Science professor
Joe Kim
Faculty of Law staff
Kelly Metcalfe
Faculty of Nursing professor

ROBERT J. BIRGENEAU
PRESIDENT
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

The University of Toronto marked a special anniversary this year…our 175th anniversary, in fact. The celebration has allowed us to look at both our history and our future. From both vantage points, it is extraordinary to see how deep the well of innovation and creativity is at U of T.

This year's National Report puts a human face on innovation. As Canada's leading research university, we intend to take our place among the world's top public research universities. We are unequivocal in our ambition, just as the individuals in this report are among the unequivocal world leaders in their disciplines.

Canada's leading research universities should emulate the world's best public research universities - University of London, ETH Zurich, University of Tokyo, University of Michigan, UC Berkeley and others. This is more than a matter of pride. Our goal is to ensure that Canada has several research universities of international stature. To do less would mean that we would fail to build on the strength of our leading faculty members and the immense potential of our talented students. We would fail to provide Canadians with the educational opportunities they deserve.

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Home | Global Competitiveness | Social Issues | Health | Science and Technology | Arts and Culture | Economic Impact |
Looking Back at 2002 | Finance and Enrolment | Great Friends | Great Minds Debate | Historical Timeline |
Subscribe to News@UofT | Main UofT Web site | Related Web sites | Contact Us | Download the PDF | View Previous National Reports